To clean your air conditioner drain, first shut off the power to your unit at both the thermostat and the breaker. Then remove the drain pan. If the pan is full of water, soak up the liquid with a few towels or rags or use a wet vacuum. You can use a solution of water and distilled vinegar, or substitute peroxide for the vinegar, to clean out the drain pipe. Let the pipe sit for a while in the solution and then put all the parts back in place. Once you start using your air conditioner on a regular basis, check it periodically to ensure condensation isn't building up.
If the air conditioner on your thermostat set low, and you aren't feeling cool air, it could be that debris is blocking the condenser. Check on your system outside and remove any tree branches or leaves from around it. Debris can easily obstruct air flow, so make sure the area around your air conditioning unit is clean and trimmed back. Make sure your filter is clean. A buildup of dirt and dust can cause poor air circulation.
2 Be sure the heat pump is receiving power. The two circuit breakers that protect the electrical circuits providing power to the air handler and heat pump condenser may have tripped. Check both the main electrical panel and any subpanels that supply power to the unit. If either circuit breaker has tripped, reset it by flipping it to OFF and then to ON. If the circuit breaker trips again, there is probably a short in the electrical system providing power to the furnace. Call an electrical contractor (Go to HomeAdvisor).

It isn’t unusual for a heat pump to ice-up in really cold weather, but it’s defrost cycle should kick on periodically to melt the ice. If the condenser unit of the heat pump is frozen up and the defrost cycle doesn’t melt the ice, turn it off. Make sure none of the return-air registers are blocked, and check the filter to make sure it isn’t clogged. If there doesn’t seem to be a problem with air flow to the unit, see more information at Heat Pump Cold Weather Problems or call an HVAC service professional.
The cost to replace your entire unit is around $4,000. That expense can range from $2,500 to $5,900, depending on the type and brand of furnace you choose. Brands particularly have an impact on that price. A Goodman electric furnace, will only cost about $2,100 for the unit and labor. On the other hand, a Trane oil furnace may cost up to $9,000 all things considered. Our Furnace Installation Cost Guide can give you a better idea on both the general cost and the differences for brands like Amana, Bryant, Coleman, and others. The brand also plays into the repair cost for your furnace. Especially the prices of individual parts can change; a York heat exchanger, for example, can cost up to $1,900, while the same component from Heil will cost as little as $400.

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