Our technicians explain all of your options before beginning the repair, so you can decide whether a repair or replacement is best for you. Our No Surprises Pricing—including charging by the job, not by the hour—means the price we quote you is the price you pay. If you decide that replacing your furnace is the best course of action, we can install a new, high-efficiency model in its place.
Be cautious with companies that offer “whole house air duct cleaning,” urges the NADCA. The company may be using unscrupulous tactics to upsell you once they get started. Before any work begins, always clarify in writing what the job entails and what the cost will be. To protect yourself against fraud, read customer reviews and verify that your HVAC cleaning service has applicable licenses and certifications.
Put simply, any home that uses air pushed through ductwork for heating purposes takes advantage of forced air heating. In other words, this term refers not to your furnace, but to the delivery method of the heat throughout your home. Forced air heating is possible with electric or gas furnaces, or a heat pump. Any issues with this delivery system that aren't directly related to the furnace likely have to do with the duct work, which costs between $35 and $55 per linear square foot to repair, or the air handling unit.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).

Many homeowners don't often think of the state of their furnace—that is until, the first cold day of the year comes around and the furnace won't turn on or only blows cold air. Keeping an eye out for common signs of trouble can help you avoid a complete furnace breakdown. Addressing any issues early on can also help you avoid most extensive (and therefore, more expensive) repairs down the road.
In addition to the information below, see these two articles for the general care and maintenance of your air conditioner: Preparing Your Air Conditioner for Summer and How to Replace Furnace & AC Filters. Most noteworthy, you should replace the filters at least twice a year, before the heating and cooling seasons. For information on furnace problems, please see Furnace Not Working.

Furnace Repair Co

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