You might guess it from the name: the heat exchanger is the part of your furnace that actually heats the air your blower motor pushes through the furnace. It consists of a chamber in which the heat energy produced by natural or propane gas is transferred to the forced air. At the same time, this part also includes a vent through which the gases themselves are safely removed from the unit and the air that enters your home. Because of these gases, a problem with your heat exchanger needs to be dealt with promptly. Over time, cracks in the exchanger can result in carbon monoxide leaks. Taking care of the problem once again means understanding the existence of a range: repairing your heat exchanger can cost as little as $100, but a full replacement may cost up to $1,200.
The belt should slip right into place. If it seems to be too tight or difficult to set in place, it may be necessary to adjust the motor mount to provide more slack. Then you can re-tighten the tension once the belt is in place. Check the manufacturer’s specifications for proper tension—in most cases, the belt should deflect about an inch when you press down on it.
The professionals here at Brothers Plumbing, Heating and Electric are well trained, experienced and seasoned experts. We have been the go-to plumbing, electrical and HVAC company in the area for over 35 years and we always come highly recommended by our many satisfied customers. We offer a 100% satisfaction guarantee, have an A+ Rating with the BBB, won the Thornton “People’s Choice Award” for 2016, drug test and background check all of our employees, email you a picture of the technician who will be providing the service before arrival and call once the service is complete to ensure 100% satisfaction. So what are you waiting for? With our competitive pricing, trained and experienced technicians, and well-rounded list of home services, we’re clearly the company to trust. Get in touch with us here at Brothers Plumbing, Heating and Electric to schedule your needed service today!
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
High-efficiency condensing furnaces (90% AFUE and above) are a bit more complex than conventional furnaces. The main differences between a conventional and condensing furnace are the heat exchanger technology used to extract heat from the combustion process and the method used to exhaust the combustion gases. In these ways, the furnaces are very different. The condensing furnace does not have a significantly more efficient combustion process than does a conventional furnace; both use gas burners with electronic ignition. The difference lies in that the condensing furnace has a more efficient heat extraction process after combustion.
Air conditioners can create a lot of water because they remove moisture from the air. To get rid of this, they have a [usually plastic] drain pipe that comes out of the side of the air handler. Over time, algae can block this pipe and, when it does, the AC won’t work. In fact, some condensate drains have a float switch that won’t let the AC run if water backs-up. Water can also puddle around the unit or flood the area. To deal with condensate problems, please see Air Conditioner Leaks Water, below.
B & B Heating & Cooling offers furnace service appointments that help keep your furnace in excellent shape and running efficiently for you all year long. Whether that’s finding small issues before they become big problems, identifying potential safety hazards or making sure you’re staying in line with your manufacturer’s warranty, our experts have you covered. Our trained technicians complete furnace service with care, inspecting a number of components in and around your furnace. In fact, our multi-point inspection can help make sure your system runs smoothly throughout the winter.
"LIFESAVER! Came right out to our home to save us from the heat. I called around 11 and they sent someone by the afternoon 1:30. Carlos fixed our AC on the spot! Very professional and knew what the issues were and fixed them all as fast as possible! Otherwise we would all be toast in this Texas Summer HEat. Thank you Carlos with Ruben's AC! Excellent service"
Ductwork pinging or popping. If you hear a pinging or popping sound coming from metal ductwork, this may be caused by thermal expansion or by air blowing past a loose flap of metal. Track along the duct runs, listening for the sound. If you find it, make a small dent in the sheet metal to provide a more rigid surface that’s less likely to move as it heats and cools.
The cost of a new furnace might make you balk at first thought, but with modern manufacturers offering an extremely diverse range of options with varying AFUE ratings, optional accessories, and more, there is a furnace to meet any budget! It’s just important that you work with the right service team and experts that will work with you rather than try to “sell” you.

Many disconnect blocks contain two cartridge fuses. Check them before you proceed with repairs (Photo 3). A blown fuse is a sign of a failing part inside the condensing unit. So don’t just replace it and think you’ve solved the problem. Instead, replace the parts we show here. Then install new fuses and fire up the unit. If it blows again, call a pro—you’ve got more serious issues.


Do you need expertise in HVAC? Roswell and Marietta residents who choose Moncrief Heating & Air Conditioning get the benefit of over 118 years of reputable experience in air conditioning and furnace repair, service and installation. Whether you have an emergency or need routine service, we are available 365 days a year. Call us today at 404-350-2300.
If your furnace needs to be repaired, you’ll want to find a qualified heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) repair technician. Each state has its own licensing requirements; some require all HVAC technicians to have an HVAC license, while others only require someone operating an HVAC service and installation company with employees to hold a contractor’s license. For example, in Alabama, the Alabama Board of Heating Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Contractors regulates licensing, while in Kansas there is no state regulatory body and HVAC licensing can vary by region. For simple furnace repairs like changing out a filter, a trusted handyman can probably handle the job, but a trained professional should be hired for tasks like replacing a gas valve, installing a new inducer fan motor or other critical furnace repair jobs that involve dealing with gas leaks or other dangerous conditions. For more, check out our tips for smart hiring on Thumbtack.
×